Thursday, February 4, 2010

Advanced DnD Monster Manual: Trampier Harpy

The other day I posted a Harpy illustration from the 1977 DnD Monster and Treasure Assortment accessory. Chevski and Spielmeister noted that it appeared to be a David A. Trampier piece. Well, here's further evidence supporting that. The Harpy from the AD&D Monster Manual. It has the same feathered body, hair and shaded wings as the illustration from the M&TA, and is signed with "DAT".

I was visiting The Sentry Box several days ago, and happened upon an old Goodman Games "Dungeon Classics" module, that features Harpies. I will have to pick that up, to see if it is any good.

12 comments:

Daddy Grognard said...

Interestingly, the Monster and Treasure Assortment harpy is left-handed whilst the MM one is right-handed. Nice to see no discrimination against us lefties in the world of harpies.

Must get round to using these lovelies in a dungeon soon.

BigFella said...

Hmm. My first blush guess would be the Monsters and Treasure Assortment illustration was Trampier's due to the distinctive line work, but looking at it, there's a lot of Erol Otis hallmarks in here too (the way the hands are positioned says Otis to me, and the way the face is drawn) Mayhap 'tis a drawing by Otis inked by Tramp? I'd say 80% liklihood it's Trampier (I was gonna say 100%, but looking at it I have my doubts.)

Timeshadows said...

The Goodman module in question is, IMO, kinda sketchy.
--YMMV.

A Paladin In Citadel said...

@Timeshadows: Thanks for the heads-up. I believe it is unsealed, so I will give it a proper read before buying.

JB said...

Ya' know the main connection I see between the two is the dagger...do harpies use daggers? I don't remember ever being stabbed by one...

Timrod said...

@ BigFella: Although I agree that there are some hints of Otus in the Monsters and Treasures harpy, if it did come out in 1977, I think it predates the Erol Otus era. I feel like his artwork doesn't crop up in TSR products until ~1979 or '80.

Akrasia said...

Some of Trampier's illustrations in the MM -- the harpy depicted here, the sylph -- certainly made a strong impression on my 10 year old mind! I wonder why?

Of course the pictures in the D&DG pushed me over the edge (Dee's stuff for the Egyptian Mythos, Rosloff's stuff for the Greek Myths, that DSL picture of Loviatar, etc.)...

Kiltedyaksman said...

The Harpy module you mentioned, IMO, shows promise. The first three quarters are good. If it gets dodgy it does so at the end. That's easily rectified.

Depending on which version you saw you might have to download the final map portion (which I beileve was left out of the original).

The premise, a tower that must be climbed with harpies flying about, was a good one.

Finally, I realize it doesn't have anything to do with harpies, but Andrew Hind's most recent module via XP Press "The Barrow Mound of Gravemoor" is really sweet.

Daddy Grognard said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
The Rusty Battle Axe said...

I am a little worried about you and the harpies. Not judging you or anything, just a bit concerned.

:-)

A Paladin In Citadel said...

:D

If it will put your mind at ease, that is the last of them (at least for a while).

The Rusty Battle Axe said...

Well, having lived in northern Minnesota for a few years, I've had a taste of the long, dark winters of the north. It can do strange things to a man, leading the mind to places better left unexplored. It explains harpies and hockey.